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Values Profile

It is important to not only consider your personality and work preferences when you are deciding on a career path or whether a specific job is the right fit for you. It is also imperative to consider your values. Your personal values provide an internal reference for what you find good, beneficial, significant, and constructive as well as what you find repulsive, negative, and destructive. Assessing your values is an important step to understanding whether a career or job is compatible with your values.

Take Action:

Step 1:  Go through the list of values below.  Eliminate words that do not resonate with you and put a check mark next to the values that are important to you.

Accessibility

Courage

Growth

Prosperity

Accomplishment

Creativity

Health

Punctuality

Accountability

Curiosity

Honesty

Recognition

Accuracy

Dependability

Humor

Relaxation

Adventure

Determination

Imagination

Reliability

Affection

Directness

Impact

Resourcefulness

Affluence

Discipline

Independence

Respect

Altruism

Diversity

Integrity

Security

Ambition

Efficiency

Intelligence

Sensitivity

Assertiveness

Empathy

Justice

Significance

Balance

Enthusiasm

Kindness

Sincerity

Bravery

Excellence

Knowledge

Speed

Calmness

Experience

Leadership

Spirituality

Celebrity

Expertise

Learning

Spontaneity

Challenge

Fairness

Love

Stability

Charity

Fame

Mindfulness

Success

Comfort

Family

Optimism

Sympathy

Commitment

Fidelity

Originality

Teamwork

Compassion

Flexibility

Passion

Understanding

Completion

Fun

Peace

Vision

Contentment

Generosity

Perfection

Wealth

Control

Grace

Power

Winning

Step 2:  Review the list of values you checked, pick your top five, and write them in the table under Step 4 in order of importance.

Step 3:  In the same table, define your values by what they mean to you.  It is important to be clear about the meaning behind the values you chose.  Sometimes two people can have different interpretations of the same word. For example, to one person, flexibility might refer to their work style on a day-to-day basis; however, to another, flexibility might refer to working on a variety of different projects simultaneously.

Step 4:  For each value, give yourself a score of 1 to 5, where 1 indicates I’m really not living this value and 5 indicates I live this value consistently.

Value

Value - Defined

Low...Alignment....High

1

 

1

2

3

4

5

2

 

1

2

3

4

5

3

 

1

2

3

4

5

4

 

1

2

3

4

5

5

 

1

2

3

4

5

 

Step 5:  Take charge and make a change!

Select the one or two values that you feel are most critical to your success and happiness and that are potentially the most out of alignment with your current lifestyle. 

Make a commitment and plan how you can bring this value back into focus.  If your top value is health and you’re always parked on a couch chowing down chips and soda, make a change.

Use the following chart to make an action plan for each of the values you chose to work on.

 

Value Needing Alignment

Action Plan & Timeline

Accountability Partner

Completed (Y/N)

    

   

    

 

Studies show you’re 33% more likely to commit to something once you put pen to paper on it.  Another way to increase your commitment level is to identify an accountability partner who can keep you motivated, honest, and on track.  Studies also show that it takes 21 sequential days to change a behavior into a habit.  Get your pen and calendar and make it happen!  

Download this activity as a worksheet